Intervention: Groyne 76

Fascinated by change, what better way to spend time than photographing groynes of the inter-tidal zone of Bexhill beach.

These images are of one post top, situated in Groyne 76.

This piece explores intervention on our shoreline, using two temporal distortions. Compressing time, I present one post top, photographed over six years, with seven images. Slowing time, I concurrently present the same post dealing with the waves of a bi-diurnal and lateral tidal flow.

 

Much of our landscape exists in its current form as a result of our intervention. Groynes are an example of this, existing in the rigours of the splash and inter-tidal zones.

This exploration has only just begun, the more I look the more I see and the more I want to know. Exploring and recording both for its own sake and for the metaphors it gives me with which to consider our relationship with this planet – our beautiful, powerful, fragile, life support system.

Click here to see a collection of prints showing the changing face of a post top.

Faceless Portrait: Me Meditation

I will be presenting `Faceless Portrait: Me Meditation’ to members of the De La Warr Pavilion Crit Group on Thursday 29 June. I am looking forward to discussing this work with the group.

Using digital space and objects, in a digital 3D environment, I am exploring its potential to weave a narrative to examine the sense of self in a portrait. The images enclosing the bust present aspects of personality, while camouflaging and then influencing our perception of the image. The face is disrupted, but not excluded – it is a faceless portrait.

Inside looking out.
I collect, make, and see.
My face is not me.

Me meditation
Kinaesthetic centring.
Ignoring the boot

 

I am working on a number of these portraits and will post them on YouTube throughout June.  

Your comments are always welcome.

Intervention: Post Top Portraits – Change Over Time

The sets of posts and planking running down the beach to the sea are an intervention in a dynamic system. They stand in the flow of sea and shingle and change the way it moves. Eddies of shingle build against them, flow over them and are battered against them by the sea.

This collection brings together images of a single post top, photographed over a number of years.
The title of each piece identifies the groyne number, and the years in which the post top was photographed.

There is often a tendency to hold on to the idea of permanence and not recognise change that happens gradually over an extended period of time. Gradual change, often unobserved is a core element of this work and acknowledges how the `natural’ world is changed in a managed environment and provides a perspective of change and the requirement to maintain an intervention in a dynamic system.

This work records the necessary tenacity of life and any structure on the beach in the intertidal zone, the dynamics of changing systems and the impact of coastal management.

Lost in Execution: Nexilis

Nexilis is the Latin word for woven together or intertwined. In this series `nexilis’ refers to the visual weaving of physical watercolour strips with the digital strips; the intertwining of physical and digital media. The weaving of the physical and the digital is a theme that runs throughout my work. 

Nexilis describes the process of working from physical watercolour through to the manipulation of the physical as digital objects, finally returning to and integrating the physical with the digital. The watercolour elements of the piece are painted, then torn into strips. The watercolour strips are photographed and manipulated into digital objects. The digital objects are used as the foundation of a series of abstract images.

Nexilis_01

 


 

Nexilis P1120417


Shown above, the underlying image is an A2 digital print overlaid with physical strips of water-coloured paper. These are the strips originally photographed and used to generate the image upon which they are now placed.

In the next image, I explore the effect of desaturation by reducing the colour palette. I apply filters to make it less paint-like and more photographic. The circular exploration of pattern and chaos continues.

Nexilis P1120417oilPaintmute

 


I am interested in the idea of reflection and this is present in both the way I think and the way I work. I have a cyclical approach; focusing on something and then leave it, return later, expand upon it, and then move on, a process that may continue indefinitely. The blend of chaos and pattern attempts to describe a search for balance.

Responsive Line: #portraitNovember

#portraitNovember on Twitter, and I share a series of faceless portraits and ask what is a portrait? Does the face have to be included to produce a portrait of a person? Or can collections of objects present an aspect of likeness? 

The objective was to achieve the likeness of a person, a sense not of what a person looks like but a sense of who the person is, using objects that form part of their everyday lives. As such it is also an exploration of metaphor as each object is a descriptive metaphor for an aspect of the individual’s life.

It is useful to consider four categories of metaphor:
Universal
Cultural
Sub-cultural
Personal

Universal metaphor is in principle understandable by any other person, regardless of culture. These tend to be things that have clear, body related, functions.

Cultural metaphors make up the majority but require the audience is of the same culture, or has understanding of that culture, to communicate.

Sub-cultural often relates to specific skills related groups and interestingly can sometimes cross cultural boundaries.

Personal metaphors are those meanings we attach to objects on the basis of personal experience.

A true sense of a person, an informative likeness, is created by the selection of appropriate objects as metaphors. The effectiveness of the metaphor depends upon which category they are in, and the degree to which the audience are part of that category.

My personal view is that the face is like a product brand and only represents us in as much as it allows others to associate particular skills, qualities and attributes with that particular brand (face).

Inside looking out
I collect, make, do and see.
My face is not me.

 

My faceless portraits form part of:

Alternative Viewpoints, Towner Gallery, Eastbourne
Saturday 3 December at 4.00pm. Free.

Blue Monkey Network artists Cliff Crawford and Jan Turner respond to the `One Day Something Happens’ exhibition at the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne. The session will take place in the gallery space and offers a participatory experience in a fast-paced workshop exploring ideas and thoughts relating to the exhibition. What creates the likeness of a person in a portrait? Consider the objects that dress the image: faceless portraits.

 

Intervention: Notes from a discussion about the groyne post project

Initial inspirations for the work:

Intervention. When and why did this begin? My personal ease of access to the beach meant that I built an intimate relationship with this particular section of seashore over an extended period of time. At the time I was seeking a connection with the physical world to balance the academic needs of the teaching profession. I feel an enormous sense of purpose and well-being when I spend time on the beach observing and recording the condition of the post-tops.

Ideas explored in Intervention:

  • Environmental impact. Changes in our climate are discussed and predicted but are we ignoring the everyday impact of the weather systems upon the landscape around us? What is man-made is often perceived as a natural landscape. The seashore I see at Bexhill is a man-managed environment disrupted by the forces of the sea.
  • Who started this intervention? Historic intervention has defined the coastal environment we experience. We are now taking responsibility for the complexity of the outcomes of past decisions.
  • Concept of relative time spans. Time spans hint at empirical reasoning – maths and science – measurement. We often have an internal story of a place that is essentially static; a single snapshot which we edit to maintain its credibility. Yet places are systems with multiple and distinct functions providing protection and adaptation of the environment to more closely match our perceived needs. To develop a more appropriate awareness of a system requires multiple, timed, documented, snapshots of the system. Systems are not static, they flow; they are in a process of constant and often complex change.

  • Living on the boundary of the land and sea you can see clearly that our attempts to control the beach are only partially and temporarily successful. The interval between the end of the late winter storms and the mechanical intervention to regrade the beach demonstrates how much the shingle moves. It is a constant challenge to our belief that we have control.

Intervention is a long-term project which began in 2002…

Bexhill Groynes 47 to 77 – A collection for 2015

Groyne 47Groyne 48Groyne 49Groyne 50Groyne 51Groyne 52Groyne 53Groyne 54Groyne 55Groyne 56Groyne 57Groyne 58Groyne 59Groyne 60Groyne 61Groyne 62Groyne 63Groyne 64Groyne 65Groyne 66Groyne 67Groyne 68Groyne 69Groyne 70Groyne 71Groyne 72Groyne 73Groyne 74Groyne 75Groyne 76Groyne 77

 


The groynes on Bexhill beach run from Groyne 1 to Groyne 121 and I have photographed them since 2002, both fascinated and amazed by their change over time. While I am pleased to have completed this extended presentation of some of my photographic collection, this is not the end. Next year will see me back on the beach, finding and recording what has changed and rediscovering what remains.

Tap on a post number to visit the full groyne post blog for 2015.

 

If you visit Bexhill beach, to see the groynes, please take care and remember to check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.

Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 77

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

G77numberSet

The photograph used to create the number for Groyne 77 was taken in 2012. Below is the same post in  2011, 2014 and 2015.

G77LMZa2011_14_15


G77MZa2011_14_15

The 3 images above of this post were taken in 2011, 2014 and 2015. I particularly like the fact that between 2014 and 2015 the same two tiny pebbles remain wedged in the crack, more worn and weed covered but still there.

G77UMZa2012_14_15

The three images of this post were taken in 2012, 2014 and 2015.

This is the 31st and final groyne in the current series of Post Top Studios. The studio presents a collection of images of post tops and other images associated with each groyne from Groyne 47 (just west of West Parade) to Groyne 77 (just east of Channel View West).

Bexhill groynes run from Groyne 1 to Groyne 121, I have been taking photographs of them since 2002 and I find myself fascinated and surprised by them. While I am pleased to have completed this particular presentation of some of what I have collected, this is not the end. Next year will see me back on the beach, finding and recording what has changed and what remains.

G77Kerrys-Drawing

Groyne 77 runs through the sail boats of Bexhill Sailing Club and can be seen from Kerry’s, on the corner of Sea Road, where I often enjoy a cup of tea and toasted teacake.

If you come to see the Groyne 77 please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.

 

Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 76

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

The photographs used to create the number for Groyne 76 were taken in 2012.

G76NumberSet

Below is the same post in  2002, 2013 and 2015.

Groin76MZc2002_13_15


G76MZa2002_11_12_13_14_15

These six photographs taken 2001, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 show it’s progression from a post to a remnant of a post.


G76-Building

Groin76Groyne

Groyne 76 joins the promenade at the eastern most edge of Channel View West.

 

If you come to see the groyne post please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.


Groyne 74 joins the promenade at Channel View West and the promenade.


Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 75

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

G75Numberset

The photographs used to create the Groyne 75 post number were taken in 2013. Below is the same post in  2012, 2014 and 2015.

P75MZ2012_14_15


P75MZa2011set

P75MZa2013set

P75MZa2015seta

 

The 3 posts above, showing the top and the seaward side, were photographed in 2011, 2013 and 2015.

G75EndPost2012_13_15

These 3 photographs are of the end-post taken 2012, 2013 and 2015. The end-post spends much of it’s time underwater and is colonized by barnacles and mussels.

G75-Building

G75Groyne

Groyne 75 joins the promenade at Channel View West.

 

If you come to see the groyne post please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.

 

 


Map-47-to-77V01.jpg