Intervention: Waveworn 3 – 23 March 2018

Waveworn open from 3 – 23 March 2018

Waveworn at Martyrs Gallery, Lewes presents a selection of work that I carried out over the past 15 years under the working title of Intervention. Please check the gallery website for opening times.

Waveworn documents weathering and erosion on the Sussex coast through the medium of film and still photography, catalogued by location and date to build up a complete and beautiful archive of change over the decades. Waveworn explores pressing issues of environmental instability, but also timeless human themes of change, impermanence and desire for (the illusion of) control.

An interview with Alex Leith for `Viva Lewes’ (March 2018 edition)

 

And it is always good to get feedback … please Tweet @Clifffart if you visit the exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intervention: The Project So Far

Intervention 2002 to 2017

Intervention is about the groynes on Bexhill beach that run to Groyne 121 and I have photographed them since 2002, both fascinated and amazed by their change over time.

This work forms the primary source for a solo exhibition `WAVEWORN‘ to be held at Martyrs Gallery, Lewes, from Saturday 3 March to Friday 23 March 2018.

Intervention 2018 will see me back on the beach, finding and recording what has changed and rediscovering what remains. The work on this project continues, photographs are being taken, notebooks and charts filled in, files organised and backed up.

This video summarises the work so far.

Intervention: Groyne 76

Fascinated by change, what better way to spend time than photographing groynes of the inter-tidal zone of Bexhill beach.

These images are of one post top, situated in Groyne 76.

This piece explores intervention on our shoreline, using two temporal distortions. Compressing time, I present one post top, photographed over six years, with seven images. Slowing time, I concurrently present the same post dealing with the waves of a bi-diurnal and lateral tidal flow.

 

Much of our landscape exists in its current form as a result of our intervention. Groynes are an example of this, existing in the rigours of the splash and inter-tidal zones.

This exploration has only just begun, the more I look the more I see and the more I want to know. Exploring and recording both for its own sake and for the metaphors it gives me with which to consider our relationship with this planet – our beautiful, powerful, fragile, life support system.

Click here to see a collection of prints showing the changing face of a post top.

Obliterated Crow

Obliterated Crow is my first solo exhibition at Murmurations Gallery, Bexhill,  from Tuesday 17th May until Sunday 29th May 2016.  The gallery is open from 10.30am to 4.30 pm (closed Mondays). Further details below…

Gallery View of Exhibition

Having both a degree in Fine Art and a Masters in IT, I experience the tension and synchronicity of these divergent disciplines. Using physical and digital media in isolation, in combination and iteratively, I produce sets and series of images to explore real and perceptual change.

We are physically and conceptually defined by the tools we use and understand. We anchor ourselves to the spotlights of our competencies, nodes in networks of change surrounded by shadow. I represent perceptual change by exploiting different tools; applying physical and digital media creates many perspectives but simultaneously hints at a singularity.

A piece of work hides as much as it reveals. Obliteration is inherent to the act of recording; this is true of both art and IT. Obliterated Crow presents a series of visual conversations between a crow, the air and the media used. My conversation began with the crow on Galley Hill. She tilted her head and made eye contact; I drew her. “Think that’s interesting?” she asked, as she skipped into the air and played with the wind.

On Saturday 21st May and Saturday 28th May there is a `Technical Walk Through‘ where I will discuss the processes used to combine the physical and digital media to produce the Obliterated Crow series.

On Sunday 22nd May and Sunday 29th May there is a `Concept Walk Through‘ where I discuss the ideas that drive my practice and those specifically related to the Obliterated Crow series.

Poster

Bexhill Groynes 47 to 77 – A collection for 2015

Groyne 47Groyne 48Groyne 49Groyne 50Groyne 51Groyne 52Groyne 53Groyne 54Groyne 55Groyne 56Groyne 57Groyne 58Groyne 59Groyne 60Groyne 61Groyne 62Groyne 63Groyne 64Groyne 65Groyne 66Groyne 67Groyne 68Groyne 69Groyne 70Groyne 71Groyne 72Groyne 73Groyne 74Groyne 75Groyne 76Groyne 77

 


The groynes on Bexhill beach run from Groyne 1 to Groyne 121 and I have photographed them since 2002, both fascinated and amazed by their change over time. While I am pleased to have completed this extended presentation of some of my photographic collection, this is not the end. Next year will see me back on the beach, finding and recording what has changed and rediscovering what remains.

Tap on a post number to visit the full groyne post blog for 2015.

 

If you visit Bexhill beach, to see the groynes, please take care and remember to check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.

Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 77

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

G77numberSet

The photograph used to create the number for Groyne 77 was taken in 2012. Below is the same post in  2011, 2014 and 2015.

G77LMZa2011_14_15


G77MZa2011_14_15

The 3 images above of this post were taken in 2011, 2014 and 2015. I particularly like the fact that between 2014 and 2015 the same two tiny pebbles remain wedged in the crack, more worn and weed covered but still there.

G77UMZa2012_14_15

The three images of this post were taken in 2012, 2014 and 2015.

This is the 31st and final groyne in the current series of Post Top Studios. The studio presents a collection of images of post tops and other images associated with each groyne from Groyne 47 (just west of West Parade) to Groyne 77 (just east of Channel View West).

Bexhill groynes run from Groyne 1 to Groyne 121, I have been taking photographs of them since 2002 and I find myself fascinated and surprised by them. While I am pleased to have completed this particular presentation of some of what I have collected, this is not the end. Next year will see me back on the beach, finding and recording what has changed and what remains.

G77Kerrys-Drawing

Groyne 77 runs through the sail boats of Bexhill Sailing Club and can be seen from Kerry’s, on the corner of Sea Road, where I often enjoy a cup of tea and toasted teacake.

If you come to see the Groyne 77 please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.

 

Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 76

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

The photographs used to create the number for Groyne 76 were taken in 2012.

G76NumberSet

Below is the same post in  2002, 2013 and 2015.

Groin76MZc2002_13_15


G76MZa2002_11_12_13_14_15

These six photographs taken 2001, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 show it’s progression from a post to a remnant of a post.


G76-Building

Groin76Groyne

Groyne 76 joins the promenade at the eastern most edge of Channel View West.

 

If you come to see the groyne post please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.


Groyne 74 joins the promenade at Channel View West and the promenade.


Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 75

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

G75Numberset

The photographs used to create the Groyne 75 post number were taken in 2013. Below is the same post in  2012, 2014 and 2015.

P75MZ2012_14_15


P75MZa2011set

P75MZa2013set

P75MZa2015seta

 

The 3 posts above, showing the top and the seaward side, were photographed in 2011, 2013 and 2015.

G75EndPost2012_13_15

These 3 photographs are of the end-post taken 2012, 2013 and 2015. The end-post spends much of it’s time underwater and is colonized by barnacles and mussels.

G75-Building

G75Groyne

Groyne 75 joins the promenade at Channel View West.

 

If you come to see the groyne post please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.

 

 


Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 74

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

Groyne 74

The photographs used to create Groyne 74 post number were taken in 2015. Below is the same post in  2011, 2013 and 2014.

Groyne 74


Groyne 74Groyne 74

These 6 post tops come from quite high up the groyne. If you look carefully at the photograph of the groyne you can make out a cluster of post tops without ferrules just down from the highest posts. The photographs were taken in 2002, 2012 and 2015.

 

If you come to see the groyne post please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.


Groyne 74 Channel View

Groyne 74 joins the promenade on Channel View West and the promenade.

 


Map-47-to-77V01.jpg

Bexhill Groyne 73

The  coastline of Bexhill on Sea, East Sussex, consists of a shingle beach maintained by a series of T-shaped, wooden piled groynes. This is a photographic exploration of a community of groynes that co-exist on the beach, next to the promenade from West Parade to Channel View. The photographs examine the individual characteristics of the post tops.   Using photo montage, the ferrule was manipulated to create the number which links the post top to the groyne in which it exists. This series of blogs presents a small selection from work that started in 2002 and continues to this day.

Groyne 73

The photograph used to create Groyne 73 post number was taken in 2015 and it is an end post: the lowest post on the groyne that spends the most time in the sea. Below is the same post in 2006, 2011, 2012, 2013, April 2014 April, and May 2014.

Groyne 73


Groyne 73

I included these twelve post tops – six above and six below – because they show a burnt pair. Photographs taken in 2002, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015.  In both pairs the sea comes from the right and the prevailing weather systems from the bottom right (the south west ). The lower set of pictures show the seaward post in the pair, this post gets the worst of the weather and protects the landward post (the ones above) to some extent. I find the fact that this post has had an L shaped half ferule bonded to it since 2006 a testament to the statistical possibility of the unlikely. While this half ferule has hung on many other post top have lost their ferules all together.

Groyne 73


G73-Buildingb

Groyne 73 joins the promenade at the back of the building on the corner of Channel View West and the promenade.

If you come to see the groyne post please take care and check tide times.

Tide times for Bexhill.


Map-47-to-77V01.jpg